Change makes change

loose change (2)

 

My husband and I were eating at Perkins Restaurant the other day.  When we went to pay our check I noticed a collection box for Give Kids the World Village (www.givekidstheworld.org).  Give Kids the World Village is a 79 acre non-profit storybook resort in Central Florida which provides week-long free vacations to children with life-threatening illnesses and their families.  The facility looks like it is straight out of a fairy tale, with 144 villa accommodations, entertainment and tickets to area theme parks.  I deposited my change into the box, and then I got to thinking, what other places offer the ability for your change to make a difference?

The first place that came to mind was McDonald’s.  Their change boxes make it possible for families of sick children to stay close to the child’s hospital at the Ronald McDonald House (www.rmhc.org).

Wendy’s Restaurants have change boxes to benefit the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption(https://davethomasfoundation.org).  Dave Thomas, Wendy’s founder was born on July 2, 1932.  He never knew his birth mother.  He was adopted by a couple from Kalamazoo, Michigan when he was six months old.  By the time he was ten years old, he had lost three stepmothers.  He never forgot his roots, and as the founder of Wendy’s he worked tirelessly until his death to help facilitate the placement of foster children into permanent, loving homes.  The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption is the only non-profit charity dedicated to placing foster children into adoptive homes in our country. Wendy’s still carries on his commitment to this day.

Panera Bread also does their part to help make the world a better place  (https://www.panerabread.com/en-us/en_us/community/community-giving.html).  They donate any remaining bread products to local hunger relief and charitable organizations at the end of every day.  They also have change canisters which help fund assistance to Feeding America, local food banks and soup kitchens and the PaneraCares Cafes (https://www.panerabread.com/en-us/articles/panera-cares-community.html).  These cafes provide a meal with dignity to all persons, regardless of their ability to pay.

A restaurant chain based out of South Central Pennsylvania, Isaac’s has collection boxes for The Crayon Initiative (http://thecrayoninitiative.org/ ).  The Crayon Initiative collects unwanted and broken crayons and recycles them into new crayons, giving them to hospitals that care for sick children.  I used to do something like that for my kids when they were young.  We would peel the paper from stubs of used and broken crayons, put them in the cups of an old muffin tin, and melt them together in the oven.  We had a blast with those crayons!  Some were a mixture of different colored crayons, and some were a single color.  I learned from The Crayon Initiative site that the wax base of crayons is not biodegradable and will never break down.  So, rather than merely tossing the crayons where they become a sticky sludge in our landfills, they get a second chance to brighten someone’s day.

A local grocery chain, Karn’s has a barrel at their doors for pet food to help local animal shelters.

And CVS drugstores is currently conducting a drive to help the American Lung Association (www.lung.org).  You may remember that CVS took a stand again smoking and stopped selling cigarettes.  The donation prompt comes up automatically as you are checking out.  You can give as little as $1.00!  It all adds up and it all helps.  Tomorrow they will be selling hot dogs and beverages to try to raise more money.  Just think if everyone who visited their store gave just $1.00.  That would be approximately $100.00 a day, and $3000.00 in a month!  If every CVS got that kind of response that would make quite an impact.  Many fewer people would have to suffer with lung disease.

So, there you have it, give a little, give a lot, it all adds up.

If you know of any stores or corporations that are trying to help, please share that information with me and I will pass it on.

Peace,

 

The Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea are made of the same water.  It flows down, clear and cool from the heights of Hermon and the roots of the Cedars of Lebanon.  The Sea of Galilee makes beauty of it, for the Sea of Galilee has an outlet.  It gets to give.  It gathers in its riches that it may pour them out again to fertilize the Jordan plain.  But the Dead Sea with the same water makes horror.  For the Dead Sea has no outlet.  It gets to keep.                                                                                       Harry Emerson Fosdick,  The Meaning of Service

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